Resources

Books

The Complete Guide to Asperger’s Syndrome

by Tony Attwood

The Complete Guide to Asperger’s Syndrome is the definitive handbook for anyone affected by Asperger’s syndrome. It brings together a wealth of information on all aspects of the syndrome for children through to adults.

Drawing on case studies and personal accounts from Attwood’s extensive clinical experience, and from his correspondence with individuals with AS, this book is both authoritative and extremely accessible.

Freaks, Geeks and Asperger Syndrome

by Luke Jackson

Have you ever been called a freak or a geek? Have you ever felt like one? Luke Jackson is 13 years old and has Asperger Syndrome. Over the years Luke has learned to laugh at such names but there are other aspects of life which are more difficult. Adolescence and the teenage years are a minefield of emotions, transitions and decisions and when a child has Asperger Syndrome, the result is often explosive.

Luke has three sisters and one brother in various stages of their adolescent and teenage years but he is acutely aware of just how different he is and how little information is available for adolescents like himself.

Drawing from his own experiences and gaining information from his teenage brother and sisters, he wrote this enlightening, honest and witty book in an attempt to address difficult topics such as bullying, friendships, when and how to tell others about AS, school problems, dating and relationships, and morality.

Neurotribes: The legacy of Autism and the future of neurodiversity

by Steve Silberman

A groundbreaking book that upends conventional thinking about autism and suggests a broader model for acceptance, understanding, and full participation in society for people who think differently.

What is autism? A lifelong disability or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is all of these things and more—and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. WIRED reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years.

NeuroTribes was the first science book to win the Samuel Johnson Prize. It has also been shortlisted for the 2016 Wellcome Book Prize.

 

Radio Interviews

Rethinking Asperger’s with Kim Dudek

CBC Radio’s The Current with Anna Marie Tremonti
Recorded December 15, 2015

Hear Kim Dudek, Aspie’s Inc. Founder, interviewed on CBC Radio’s The Current. This is a continuation of a conversation from the previous week’s episode.

Rethinking autism through the prism of neurodiversity

CBC Radio’s The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti
Recorded December 08, 2015

“Autism is a difference, not a failed version of normal”, says Steve Silberman, author of “NeuroTribes.”

Films

Mozart and the Whale

Released to DVD in 2006, the film struggled to find a distributor in the US, due to lack of support by prominent cast members who didn’t like the final version. Mozart and the Whale is the story of two people who both have Aspergers Syndrome. It follows their lives through both good and bad times.

Rain Man

This multi-award winning film starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman is the story of two brothers, one of whom is autistic. A cross-country trip to take one sibling home becomes the journey that ends up changing their lives.

My Name Is Khan

Staring Bollywood legend Shah Rukh Khan and produced by Karan Johar, My Name is Khan is the story of Rizwan Khan, a Muslim gentleman with Aspergers Syndrome. It is also the story of two people from different backgrounds who marry and begin a life together despite the challenges Rizwan faces in daily life.

The film is also set around 9/11 and looks at some of the issues surrounding that time in history.  As of 2010, My Name is Khan grossed US$38.5 million at the box office worldwide. In the same year, it was also the highest ever grossing Bollywood film internationally. The film went on to be released in 43 countries and recently celebrated six years since its release.